Lighthouse Urk

The lighthouse on Urk

On the most western part of Urk stands the 18,5 meter tall lighthouse. Because of the closure of the Southsea and the formation of the IJssellake, the lighthouse has become less important as a light beacon, but still the perfect tower to find a nice view of Urk. Form the tower, in clear weather, the provinces of Flevoland, North Holland and Friesland can be seen. The lighthouse contains a small exhibition on the ground floor about the activities or the lighthouse keepers and special occurrences.

History of the lighthouse on Urk

It is said that the first coal fire was lit in 1617 on Urk. This fire was intended for the fishermen of Urk and ships from Amsterdam sailing via the North sea. The fishermen were shown a save passageway. The lighthouse, in its current form, was built in 1844. The design came from J. Valk, which was built during the reign of King William II. Behind the lighthouse lies an anchor that probably belonged to the fleet of Michiel de Ruyter.

About the lighthouse

The white tower consists of four floors with a red coloured lightwork at the top. To give the light a rotating effect, a weight was hung in the middle of the tower. Due to sinking of the weight, the lenses started rotating around the stationary lamp. Every five seconds a light beam of 0.2 seconds is visible. The weight still hangs from the lighthouse, although the light has been replaced for an automatic one. The house of the keeper is connected to the tower and built in the 1950s after the old house was replaced. There is a plaque on the lighthouse on which the purpose and origin of the lighthouse are written.